Begin typing your search above and press return to search. Press Esc to cancel.

With the recent budget update in Queensland and large projects such as Adani’s Carmichael Coal mine poised to start, it’s timely to take stock of the importance of the resources industry to the state. According to Queensland Resources Council (QRC) industry data, gathered from its full-member companies (those who are in production), one in every eight jobs and one in every $5 spent in Queensland is directly related to the mining and resources industry.  The QRC estimates the industry supports some 14,200 businesses and direct expenditure data indicates the contribution of mining and resources companies to the Queensland economy in 2017/2018

Warning: the following story contains lots of rude words — sort of. It’s not that they are really rude, but more that they don’t fit the strict rules imposed by our digital world. You know, the kinds of rules that seek to clean up websites, stop smutty posts being added on Facebook, or prevent you writing body parts randomly on forms instead of your real name. And that’s the kind of thinking that caught out Natalie Weiner. https://twitter.com/natalieweiner/status/1034533245839450113 Natalie, as we will call her to get this post through your spam filter, wasn’t alone. Her pain was shared by James Butts, Ben Schmuck, several blokes named

WA had reason to be pleased after the GST reform package cleared the Senate recently but one big question still remains: did it have to take so long? And, building on that query, would the previous GST system have been overhauled more quickly if it were NSW and Victoria being penalised rather than us? The good news for WA is that key economic pointers suggest we’re continuing to emerge from the worst downturn in living memory. The GST fix can only help. But despite those green shoots, it’s fair to say that Canberra is only just starting to gain a true appreciation for

In 1908, Henry Ford revolutionised the car industry with the implementation of the production line for the Model T Ford. The process of mechanisation lowered costs and sped up production, allowing the car to go mainstream and replace the horse and cart. The advent of the personal computer and its evolution over time has allowed significant increases in data flow and streamlining of work processes. While this initially led to a loss of some jobs in areas such as typing pools, this was more than offset by an increase in the number of more productive jobs as well as increased productivity

It’s been a good year to be purple. Heck, it was even officially named the colour of the year. Sure the Pantone colour of the year is technically Ultra Violet, but in the light of our own branding, we are happy to claim it (and assume our competitors are green with envy). The last time we got so excited was back in 1999, when Pantone nominated Cerulean as “colour of the millennium”, with the optimistic hope that it would herald a new age in which “consumers will be seeking inner peace and spiritual fulfillment”. According to Pantone, Ultra Violet (also known as Pantone 18-3838) is

Premier Mark McGowan’s announcement today of a mid-term reshuffle of his cabinet should be welcome news – particularly for anyone involved in the energy industry. For nearly two years of Mr McGowan’s premiership, Mines and Petroleum sat with Bill Johnston, while Energy was with Treasurer Ben Wyatt. The same split had existed as part of the previous Liberal government and in my opinion it never really worked, given that delivering energy in WA is a continuous process. The Mining and Petroleum portfolio contains the upstream elements of our oil and gas resources; Energy holds the downstream delivery into electricity and gas markets. Finally putting

Perth’s burgeoning population means now is the time to invest in public transport and urban job centres. But council mergers and tax incentives should also be considered as we look to avoid more suburban sprawl. Perth’s population is forecast to reach 4.4 million by 2046, overtaking Brisbane as the third-largest city in the country. Read the full story on PerthNow.

How did formerly cutting-edge companies like Nokia and Kodak lose their way? Why do some businesses evolve, and yet others get left behind? What is the next Toys ‘R’ Us, or Blockbuster, or Blackberry, poised to go extinct through lack of innovation? Continual change is a guarantee of successful business, not just in terms of the processes you use or the services or products you offer: the culture of a business needs to evolve as well. Nokia is a good example of how a corporate culture didn’t evolve, leaving the company struggling to reclaim a once buoyant market share. Failing to appreciate

So, you’ve signed up to Twitter and to your disappointment no one is reading your tweets or responding to your brilliant insights. It’s a common complaint for many Twitter users: if you’re not already famous, no one is listening to anything you say. So, to help you get a little more out of the platform here are some top tips to assist you with being heard. Use your real name If you want to build a professional network and for people to take you seriously, you need to use your real name. People are much more likely to trust you and what

A lot is made of how being smart leads to business success – and deservedly so. Achieving results is a by-product of making informed (and ultimately, correct) decisions at the right time. But you’re selling yourself short if you underestimate the importance of emotional intelligence, particularly in an era in which social media is at the heart of how so many people live their lives. I’d argue that no platforms tug on the emotions like social media channels. If you can understand the concerns, issues and emotions faced by your clients, you can start working on delivering content via those channels that

Here are some simple and easy tips for optimising your existing brand or developing a new one. Don’t try to do everything in one logo There are many things I love to eat. I love a great, thin crust pizza with a simple range of ingredients. I also love big, fluffy waffles covered in chocolate ice-cream and one thing I can never go past is my mum’s pumpkin soup. However, just because I love all these individual foods doesn’t mean I can cram all the flavours together to make a super food. Indeed, quite the opposite. What I would end up

With digital technology so widely accessible, we are constantly using it. But that constant use leaves a feeling of unease with many researchers and human behaviour experts, concerned with how our attention is being captured by devices rather than voluntarily regulated. And yet technology also offers positives such as memory improvement, problem-solving skills and multitasking skills. “We’re all pawns in a grand experiment to be manipulated by digital stimuli to which no one has given explicit consent” – Richard Davidson, neuroscientist. Read the full story on vox.com.

Two years on from an historic vote to leave the European Union, a legally binding agreement is finally in place to seal Britain’s exit. The BBC breaks down everything you need to know about the messy divorce. A vote among British MPs on the withdrawal agreement has been delayed - but must be held on or before January 21. Read the full article at bbc.com.

AI points to a future where machines will not only do the physical work they’ve been undertaking since the Industrial Revolution but also the thinking that goes with it. Opinion remains divided, however, on whether this will lead to a glorious Utopia. Artificial Intelligence – specifically machine learning and deep learning – was everywhere in 2018 and don’t expect the hype to die down over the next 12 months. Read the full article at forbes.com

WA Premier Mark McGowan has used today’s Committee for Economic Development of Australia WA State of the State event in Perth to reveal an expected return to budget surplus a year ahead of schedule. And the Premier says the surplus – now slated for the 2019-20 financial year – won’t just be a case of “squeaking over the line”. “It’s the first time Western Australia will be in surplus for six years,” Mr McGowan told a packed room at the Perth Exhibition and Convention Centre. “This will be a substantial surplus in the hundreds of millions of dollars. And there will be a

Space can be a funny thing. On one hand, it’s a totally finite concept with set dimensions and limitations. On the other, few commodities are as fluid when we opt to change our way of thinking. I was reminded of this again recently when I moderated a Property Council of Australia event on the Future of Space. Any idea who the biggest private office tenant in Manhattan, London and Washington is? If you answered WeWork, then you’re ahead of the curve. If you haven’t heard of WeWork, well watch this “space”- because it is coming to Perth and will significantly change our office

Divorce is expensive. Wouldn’t you rather spend money on improving your relationship and having fun? Our friend, health scientist and TEDxPerth speaker Amanda Lambros, discusses why you need to make time in your relationship for dates and how spending $2500 a year on two outings a month can save your relationship. At Cannings Purple, we put family and relationships first and know that a happy environment helps deliver the best results for our clients. Trust us, Amanda’s message is worth watching.

WA’s battery power: a question of opportunity and cost It’s no secret that WA stands on the crest of a potential once-in-a-lifetime opportunity in the new energy and battery materials sector – but how do we best place ourselves to take advantage of it and how far should we go down the production chain? Those key questions, in the face of projections that the “new energy boom” could be worth as much as $56 billion to WA,  form part of a major report launched by the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of WA in November. WA’s Future In The Lithium Battery Chain explores