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Christmas is coming. We’ve all seen brands dressing up and letting their hair down during the Christmas period. Sometimes it’s a hat, other times a wreath or bells. Every year I have one person or another ask me if it’s a good idea to put a Santa hat on their website and social media logos. Every year, with a pinch of Christmas grinch, I have to say no. Rules for Christmas branding One of the first rules of branding is: do not change any part of your logo. Brand recognition is hard enough to earn, so eroding it by making it less

Thankfully, here in Western Australia we’ve been spared rising COVID-19 infection rates and the social unrest that has been felt in many other destinations. But how has our response to the pandemic strengthened our State’s reputation? Last week, some of Perth's best communication specialists battled it out at IABC's event, The Great Debate. We took the opportunity to hear what they thought.   WA’s Major Industries Continue to Make a Considerable Contribution Chamber of Minerals and Energy’s Director, Policy and Advocacy, Rob Carruthers said he believed COVID-19 has made WA’s brand stronger on the national stage. “As we’ve seen over the last few months, and how

Zak Leading the WA Liberal Party First-term MP, Zak Kirkup is the new leader of the WA Liberal Party, after being elected unopposed following Dean Nalder pulling out of the contest. Mr Kirkup is the party's youngest leader since Matt Birney's short stint in the mid-2000s. He was elected as Dawesville MP in 2017, and replaces Ms Liza Harvey, who resigned as Leader on Sunday morning. Mr Kirkup assumes the role just 109 days out from the March State election. Ms Libby Mettam Voted as Deputy Leader Former Journalist turned Vasse MP, Ms Libby Mettam, was also voted in unopposed as Deputy Leader. The Bench

Let’s face it, engaging your community can be daunting. Our Stakeholder Engagement specialist, Sarah-Jane Dabarera shares five steps you can take to help shake-off the fear and embrace the process of community consultation. 1. Talk to your community If you’re concerned about how your community might respond, it could seem counterintuitive to just get out there and talk to them, but this is the best place to start. Starting a conversation with a few individuals first may assist your understanding of community concerns and issues. Early conversations with a sample stakeholder group can improve your research and build the case for more detailed