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Following the Federal Election, incoming Prime Minister Anthony Albanese’s immediate commitment to the Uluru Statement from the Heart and this year’s National Reconciliation Week theme of Be Brave, Make Change have brought into sharp focus the priority business and governments have placed on closing the gap between our First Nation peoples and non-indigenous Australians. But how often do we see this commitment translate into meaningful action? In his opening address at the WA launch of National Reconciliation Week, Western Australia’s Aboriginal Affairs Minister Tony Buti spoke of the Aboriginal Empowerment Strategy and his government’s commitment to better outcomes for Aboriginal people in

Premier and Treasurer Mark McGowan has delivered another bumper budget, with a $5.7 billion surplus facilitating record healthcare investment and a one-off cost of living boost for Western Australians. But the real headline for any WA budget is always iron ore – and that has meant good news in the past couple of years for the McGowan Government. See also: 2022 WA budget fast facts Of the State’s $38.428 billion total forecast revenue for the upcoming 2022-23 financial year, revenue from iron ore royalties accounts for $5.645 billion. However, compared to the financial year about to end, this represents a significant decline in iron

Before we look forward to 2022-23, it’s also helpful to look back to what happened in 2021-22. That year’s budget forecast a surplus of $2.8 billion based on an iron ore price assumption of $121.30 per tonne. After a surplus of $5.8 billion in 2020-21, the 2021-22 surplus is estimated to come in ever so slightly lower at $5.7 billion. This figure is clearly well above the previous forecast mainly due to a higher than forecast iron ore price over the last year This resulted in net debt falling from $33 billion in 2020-21 to $30 billion in 2021-22. As Mr McGowan

As the worst economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic appear to be waning, the cost of living is coming into focus as the major issue facing Australians, potentially swinging their vote as the election approaches. But why are we finding it harder to make ends meet? Will things get better soon? And what can the Commonwealth government do to help ease the pressure? Well, as my old State Treasury colleagues would say: it’s complicated and it depends. Inflation creation Rising cost of living is generally synonymous with higher inflation.  But inflation has been fairly stable over the last five years with the Consumer

Bored Apes are 2022’s hottest thing in crypto - but what are they, and why are they selling for millions of dollars? Sometime around April last year, a series of gaudily illustrated anthropomorphic monkeys started creating something of a buzz on social media. As we lurch towards the midway point of 2022, it’s fair to say that buzz has amplified into a virtual cacophonic rumble, as Bored Apes have swiftly become some of the most sought after - and most valuable - forms of modern art. At launch, owning a Bored Ape would have set you back just less than $US200. Not that