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Engaging – it’s the word most often used to describe great content on the internet. Readers who are engaged keep their eyes on website pages for longer, and engaged customers feel compelled to act and purchase products. Length of time on site and customer conversion are two of the most common goals for content strategies. Video and podcasts have become popular ways of creating content, but the written word remains an important pillar of content strategies. Writing for the web, or indeed any public medium, can feel intimidating for those unfamiliar with it – but the best strategy is to prepare and keep

We are proud to announce that Cannings Purple has been recognised as an Employer of Choice in The Australian Business Awards (ABA) 2020. Although we’ve won a host of awards over the years, both regionally and internationally, we are particularly delighted to be recognised as an Employer of Choice.     Annette Ellis is our CEO: “We invest a great deal in workplace culture and values, then hire people who share them.  This means that our values don’t live in a manual, or on a poster in the kitchen, they are reflected in behaviours that we hold each other accountable for and that’s a

From ‘Back in Black’ to a more than $966 billion budget blackhole in 2024, Federal Treasurer Josh Frydenberg has handed down the most significant budget in Australian history. Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Government has provided $257 billion in direct economic support to cushion the blow and strengthen the recovery. The 2020-21 Budget commits a further $98 billion including $25 billion in direct COVID-19 response measures and $74 billion in new measures to create jobs. The 2020-21 Budget is focussed on measures to stimulate a private sector-led recovery that drives economic growth and employment, as well as trying to

The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic has significantly changed the way West Australians go about everyday life. Much of this change relates to the increasingly digital flavour of our working lives. With so many offices closed, we’ve used programs like Microsoft Teams to conduct meetings and co-ordinate workflows, while communicating with (and being part of) webinar audiences that stretch across the world. But amid all the disruption, we’ve also seen examples of the best of humanity. Fremantle’s Left Bank pub, for instance, is retaining and paying staff under the Federal Government’s Job Keeper program but, with the venue shut, sending them out to

Telstra chairman John Mullen touched on a variety of issues when he spoke at the Australian Institute of Company Directors’ Rottnest Forum recently – covering everything from the attainability and practicalities of work-life balance to the limitations of the minimum wage. But the subject that struck the biggest chord with me was the damage that can be done to a business’ reputation by a small percentage of unhappy customers or stakeholders. As Mullen highlighted, a business doesn’t have to deliberately do something wrong to create significant reputational issues. Equally, the potential damage from that wrongdoing has little to do with whether or

The ongoing rollout of 5G networks around Australia won’t just make for much faster internet connections on our mobile devices – it is also set to pose an increasingly challenging test of the crisis communications capabilities of businesses and organisations. Speaking at a recent webinar on crisis communications hosted by media monitoring company Meltwater, international communications expert John Bailey said 5G capabilities would supercharge existing trends in our behaviour around disasters and noteworthy public incidents. Bailey, who has extensive experience working with airlines on crises responses, mapped out the evolution of social media around airline emergency situations in recent years. While the crash

The concept of social licence to operate has a lot of currency in the resources sector. Increasingly resource companies see their social licence to operate as a strategic issue for the board, central to their success, with loss of social licence a key business risk. Social licence is, however, a relatively new concept, and emerged just over 20 years ago. First used by Canadian mining executive James Cooney in discussion with World Bank officials, it was originally coined as a metaphor to argue that the trust and acceptance of society was just as important as a regulatory licence for resource operations. The concept

The royal commission into the abuse of people with disability will be the most expensive in this country’s history, with $527 million budgeted for an inquiry that is expected to run for three years. It will also be Australia’s seventh royal commission in six years, as commissions  have become the ‘new normal’ when governments look to address significant issues in society. So, what do you need to know about the Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability, especially if you are a provider in the sector? What is the scope of the royal commission? Needless to say, with a three-year span, this commission’s scope is

In Western Australia last year 51 young people suicided – almost one death a week. Youth suicide is the biggest single killer of our nation’s young people. This is a hard fact to hear and an even harder one to comprehend. But this week the shocking reality of the rate of youth suicide in our community provides all the motivation required for our group of more than 170 cyclists to ride 700km in four and a half days. After six months of hard training and fund raising, riders in the annual Hawaiian Ride for Youth will today begin the long journey from Albany or Jurien Bay back to Perth. To have

An awful lot can happen in five years, which is how long it had been between drinks when the ASX recently released a fourth edition of its Corporate Governance Principles and Recommendations. It’s very likely the document was due for updating anyway but the findings of the Royal Commission into the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry have only reinforced that need. The new ASX principles make it abundantly clear – just as Commissioner Kenneth Hayne has done in his Commission findings – that the pursuit of profit cannot be the sole motivation for listed companies’ business practices. Instead, in what is perhaps the