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It could be surprising to learn that Australia Day has only been officially celebrated on January 26 for just over three decades, even though it has been 252 years since Captain James Cook first raised the Union Jack to signal the beginning of the Australian colony in August 1770.  In that context, the 34 years since January 26 was named the official date of Australia Day celebrations in 1988 represents a very short period of time.  The first Australia Day celebration was held on July 30 in 1915 to raise money for the war effort. In 1916, it was changed to July

Even in the most positive jobs market in memory, attending a job interview can be a daunting experience. You enter an unfamiliar environment, unclear about what you might be asked, who you’ll be facing or how long you might be there. You need to prepare for a grilling in case there’s little time between questions for reflection. It’s a high-stress environment, where every mistake or slip-up counts, with performance anxiety getting in the way of what you really have to offer. Is there a better way? Well, the pandemic suggests that might be the case. Reinventing the interview process Back in 2018, LinkedIn looked at

Cannings Purple had a big year in 2021; helping hundreds of clients achieve their strategic goals, welcoming many new members to our team, and even gaining international recognition at the 2021 Asia-Pacific SABRE awards. Tune in as a few of our team members reflect on their favourite projects from the last 12 months. Getting WA to the moon Our incoming Director of Corporate Affairs, Carina Tan-Van Baren, found it difficult to narrow it down to one project, but as a bit of a space-nerd, she couldn’t help but settle on working with Curtin University’s Space Science and Technology Centre to send WA's first

We recently announced some important changes to our Board and executive team. National Director Karen Brown, who has been with Cannings Purple for more than seven years and is set to retire at the end of this year, has accepted the role of Board Chair with effect from 1 February 2022, when our co-founder and current Chair, Warrick Hazeldine, will step down. With a growing portfolio of directorships and his private equity advisory service requiring more of his attention, Warrick has decided to step away from the demands of chairing the State’s largest communications firm. “Now is the right time for me to

Australia is undergoing a social and economic experiment that will rival the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic. After more than 18 months of measures designed to curb and crush the virus, some states have conceded it is nigh on impossible to suppress the virulent Delta strain — and that ‘living with the virus’ is the path forward. For WA, watching this unfold east of the rabbit-proof fence, with no restrictions or masks, and little fear, there are lessons to be learned: not only about what could happen if the virus re-enters the State, but about how businesses, government and institutions

Last month, the WA Government confirmed it will have one of the broadest vaccine mandates in the country, covering an estimated million workers and building on earlier requirements for all health, hotel quarantine, aged care and port workers to be vaccinated. The new measures identify two groups of employees and industries that will need to be vaccinated to ensure critical services can be delivered. The first group — high risk occupations — includes healthcare workers, emergency services personnel, mine site workers and pharmacists, dentists and meat workers, among others, who now have a range of deadlines for double vaccination, all by January 1

There are few more stressful experiences than standing before a packed media scrum. Karen Brown Cannings Purple's National Director explains why prior preparation is the key to a successful media engagement. Think – breathe. Think – breathe. Think – breathe. Listen to the question. Listen carefully. Speak slowly. Speak clearly. Speak in complete sentences. Don’t say anything stupid! Cameras rolling…… Hot lights glowing, assertive journalists firing questions. The stakes are high. Your answers are on the record and will be the subject of intense and immediate scrutiny. You have a limited time to deliver critical information or a clear message and your efforts will be judged by your

When it comes to assessing whether your community sponsorship is valuable, it is time to talk about intangible benefits. Yes, your logo will be getting seen. Yes, your name is on the sign. But what about the less visible benefits of your investment? Studies into the impact of intangible benefits of sponsoring sports, arts, community events or local facilities find a conundrum: either companies overestimate the value of the intangible benefits of their sponsorship — or they don’t count the benefits at all. There is also the risk that the intangible benefits — the opportunity to host your top corporate peers in a footy

The WA Government has confirmed it will have one of the broadest vaccine mandates in the country, covering an estimated million workers and building on earlier requirements for all health, hotel quarantine, aged care and port workers to be vaccinated.   The new measures identify two groups of employees and industries that will need to be vaccinated to ensure critical services can be delivered.  The first group — high risk occupations — includes healthcare workers, emergency services personnel, mine site workers and pharmacists, dentists and meat workers, among others, who now have a range of deadlines for double vaccination, all by January 1 next year.   The second group — critical occupations —  with a double-vax deadline

Meaningful brand activism is no longer a nice-to-have, it is a must-have. The Year That Shall Not Be Named set this in stone as some brands were celebrated for making a difference while others floundered. One of the most pivotal events was the tragic death of George Floyd, a cataclysmic event that prompted weeks of protests and civil unrest across the United States. It started a long overdue conversation about police brutality and racial injustice around the world, including in Australia. It sparked discussions around dinner tables, on the floor of parliament, and in office lunchrooms. 2020 marked the end of staying silent. No comment

There’s nothing like a social media slam to give business leaders a wake-up.   It might be a cranky customer who has hopped on Facebook in the wee hours, adding angry-face emojis to their diatribe.   It might be criticism of your staff on Twitter by an upset ‘egg’ with three followers and a disdain for punctuation.   Something about the immediacy and human face of social media means that comment, and the scattered retweets or likes that follow, can cut to the heart of a business.   But while social media monitoring is vital, if you are not also watching traditional media sources, you are seeing only a small part of the picture.   Traditional media like newspapers, magazines, online

With the recent launch of Western Australia’s first homegrown satellite, WA researchers are making space more affordable and accessible for the little guy. As Australia looks to diversify and future-proof our economy, reducing reliance on traditional sectors like agriculture and resources, our eyes are increasingly turning upwards, to the stars. Once the domain of dreamers, visionaries and distant superpowers with deep pockets, the space sector is emerging as a significant new generator of jobs, investment and commercial opportunities. But we’re not the only ones to recognise this potential. In fact, we’re a little late to the party. Governments around the world have dedicated $82.5

Splitting the bill isn’t what it used to be.   Not so long ago, the end of a dinner out with friends would be a cue to scramble for an ATM, dig deep for notes and coins, and write an IOU to settle the evening’s expenses.  Now it is more likely one person will pay the bill and the rest will send their share through an online banking transaction that might land with the payer in a few days.  And it’s not just restaurants.  Australians are well versed with electronic money, with most people familiar with online banking, e-commerce and tap-and-go – and thanks to COVID-19, many of us don’t carry any physical cash at all.    So what if we did away

Traditionally, brands have stayed neutral when it comes to politics and social issues. It’s generally been felt that taking sides risks alienating a large proportion of a customer base. But in today’s increasingly polarised climate, staying neutral can actually be riskier. As consumers look for ways to support the world’s most pressing issues, including the present threat of climate change, and fighting social and racial injustice, many see their wallets as a way to do so. Social analysts, McCrindle, found that this approach was particularly prevalent among Gen Z consumers who want to know exactly where brands stand on complex issues before investing. COVID-19

The most popular overseas COVID-19 vaccination campaigns have included comedy skits, well-liked celebrities, and catchy music, all using creative out-of-the-box thinking to encourage their citizens to get the jab.  New Zealand, U.K and Singapore get creative In New Zealand, their positive ‘Ka Kite, COVID’ campaign became an online favourite. It’s warm and funny, and incorporates the Maori language, declaring ‘Ka kite, COVID’, meaning ‘see you, COVID’ in the Maori language.  This ad clearly targets different audiences and promotes the message that "vaccination is for the community not just the individual".  In the U.K, Sir Elton John and Sir Michael Caine help the NHS promote COVID jabs in a humorous 90-second ad.   Singapore’s quirky  ‘Get Your Shot, Steady Pom Pi Pi’  is something else entirely. A disco-themed

What is brand recognition? Brand recognition is exactly what you might expect. It’s how your stakeholders and members of the public 'recognise' your brand. Beyond the name of your business, a good brand recognition strategy involves the development of colour schemes, logos, visual elements and tone of voice that people can attribute to your brand. Prioritising how a story is told increases the likelyhood of positive brand recognition for an organisation. Actively telling your story By actively telling the story of your company and the people working there, and sharing its values, you are influencing how people view your business. A professionally written news story, a

“It was the first time I felt respected” – the words of a 60-year-old Aboriginal man who had spent many years living on the streets of Perth. He made the comment after he and other residents at a transitional accommodation centre in Perth had the opportunity to have a yarn with Premier Mark McGowan following an announcement of additional funding for homelessness at the start of the election campaign last year. Aboriginal people make up about 40 per cent of the street homeless population, so as the organiser of an event for this transitional accommodation centre, I wanted to ensure that some

This year’s National Reconciliation Week theme, “More than a word. Reconciliation takes action” challenges us to take more courageous action that will deliver real impact. This is a challenge individuals and businesses should enthusiastically embrace. There is a lot to do Australia’s First Nations People have lived on, cared for and formed a deep connection to the lands that make up Australia for at least 50,000 years. 233 years ago, the dispossession of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people from their lands began. In the years following, thousands of First Nations people were massacred, thousands more were subjected to slavery and forced labour,

In the deep and chilling midst of a crisis, we believe it is possible to still demonstrate to stakeholders your purpose and your values, and ultimately strengthen the equity of your brand.   Qantas Flight 32  4 November 2010. Heading for Sydney, a Qantas Airbus A380 took off from Singapore’s Changi Airport with 469 passengers and crew on board.  Just a few minutes after take-off, one of the aircraft’s Rolls-Royce Trent 900 engines started blasting heavy, red-hot chunks of the engine through the wing, severely damaging critical control systems.   Fortunately, two hours later, the aircraft made a successful emergency landing at Changi.  Qantas CEO, Alan Joyce personally took control of the airline’s reputation in the aftermath. Dozens

A lot of words have been written about writing and making speeches – probably far too many, but here are a few more. In fact, there are probably more secrets to giving great speeches, than Burgess, Maclean or Philby ever passed to the Soviets during the Cold War. Most have been developed by professional communicators based on years of experience, both practical and observed, and will contribute to the preparation and delivery of a good speech. Many are to do with how you perform on the stage, the development of the content and engaging with your audience, with technical tips such as

Josh Frydenberg’s third Budget dropped this week with all the hype of a new record. In musical circles artists tend to branch out creatively on their third album, diverting from the mainstream and even their own genre to try new things. The Treasurer appears to be doing just that with the 2021-22 Budget. More funding has been directed to social policies rather than economic policies and this Budget shuns the traditional Liberal pursuit of surplus to focus on spending, job creation and stimulus. Politically, it has captured traditional Labor policy space, making it hard for the Opposition to attack it in the

WA continues to lead the COVID-19 recovery - with all jobs lost due to the pandemic now recovered and a further 20,000 jobs created. There are more than 1.4 million Western Australians now employed - the highest result on record. Employers need skilled workers  They are searching for sous chefs in Kununurra. They can’t get enough mechanics in Kal. And in the Great Southern, there’s a desperate need for farm workers, labourers, carpenters, waiters — anyone, really.   The fears of an economic depression and mass unemployment a year ago suddenly seems overblown as WA enters a skill-shortage not seen since the days of the last mining boom.   The reasons behind

If you don't already know who Ray Jordan is, he's one of Western Australia’s most highly-regarded corporate communicators and strategists, who, before moving to corporate communications, held executive positions in the media – including the role of Deputy Editor of The West Australian. Ray is also one of Australia’s most experienced wine journalists and has been writing about wine for nearly forty years, with his first articles published in the late 1970s. He is currently the Wine Editor for Seven West Media. Ray's first photo taken as a cadet journalist in February 1976   Given Ray's long-standing career in media and communications, I was keen

If you’re part of the property sector in Australia, you’re feeling pretty upbeat right now – so upbeat, in fact, that your confidence levels and positive outlook on the industry are at an all-time high.  That’s the findings of the latest ANZ/Property Council Survey, released this morning and based on the views of some 830 owners, developers, agents, managers, consultants and government representatives across the country.   Now in its tenth year, the quarterly national survey is one of the biggest sentiment measures in the Australian property industry and provides a temperature check on national, state and territory economies, property asset class performance, employment intentions, expected workflows and

For business, Media Intelligence can be an invaluable tool, especially when used the right way. Unlike the common perception, Media Intelligence is more than just a regurgitation of every time you or your brand is mentioned. In fact, there are five very important ways following your news can improve your business and client outcomes. 

"Building a fairer and healthier world for everyone" is the focus of World Health Day – celebrated yesterday. Founded in 1948 by the World Health Organization (WHO), in 2021 the WHO is calling on leaders to ensure that everyone has living and working conditions that are conducive to good health.  Access to health For this year, WHO notes the COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted that some people are able to live healthier lives and have better access to health services than others - entirely due to the conditions in which they are born, grow, live, work and age.   Australia's health system The WHO has identified Australia as one of the most well-prepared

There’s an African proverb that when elephants fight, it’s the grass that suffers — and that’s been abundantly clear for Australian media in the past few weeks.   Facebook vs News Corp In the blue corner is Facebook, market capitalisation of USD $741 billion, with as many daily users as the entire populations of all of North America, Europe and Latin America combined.   In the red corner is News Corp, a mere $10 billion in market capitalisation, but in charge of a sprawling international TV, news, digital and magazine empire that in Australia extends from Sky News to The Australian to the Fremantle-Cockburn Gazette.   Alongside are Australia’s other big news houses: Nine, which owns

For many, the idea of stepping on to a stage or standing before a group of peers to make a presentation is nearly worse than death. Some might even believe it really is worse than death! And to heighten anxiety and frustration, seeing someone else standing there, seemingly relaxed and delivering with certainty and clarity to a completely captivated audience, just makes your own shortcomings so much more real. Where are their nerves? How is this person so calm, while I am struggling the get even the simplest sentence out? A duck in a pond Delivering a presentation or speech is a little like

Facebook has made the unprecedented move of banning Australian news publishers (and users) from sharing or viewing any news articles on the platform. It’s a response to the Federal Government’s bargaining code which has passed through the House of Representatives, and which will require social media companies to pay news organisations if their content appears on the platform. For many Australian users, this means their main source of daily news - their Facebook newsfeed - will look very different, with only content appearing from friends and family, and non-news organisations. It’s a bold, even aggressive action, on Facebook’s part. If you look at