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In the past couple of weeks, an incredible number of Australian businesses have responded to the COVID-19 crisis by enabling employees to work either from home or other remote locations. We’ve implemented this at Cannings Purple and many of our clients and referrers are also now working away from the office. But having a desire to work remotely is one thing and doing it effectively is quite another. There are communications challenges that need to be navigated and cyber security questions that need to be answered. There is also the very important issue of what technology you are going to use and

Recently I was asked to speak in Sydney at the Corporate Affairs Summit, Australasia’s most senior and significant gathering of corporate affairs and communication executives. These events are always a perilous mix of unusual insight (this year a senior leader from tobacco company Philip Morris was the day one keynote speaker) and potential navel-gazing, as 300-plus communications professionals meet in the same room. But the panel I was on was particularly interesting, even if I do say so myself! I was asked to discuss the importance of authenticity in professional communications, especially with regards to large-scale consumer communications. This is a fascinating topic,

Telstra chairman John Mullen touched on a variety of issues when he spoke at the Australian Institute of Company Directors’ Rottnest Forum recently – covering everything from the attainability and practicalities of work-life balance to the limitations of the minimum wage. But the subject that struck the biggest chord with me was the damage that can be done to a business’ reputation by a small percentage of unhappy customers or stakeholders. As Mullen highlighted, a business doesn’t have to deliberately do something wrong to create significant reputational issues. Equally, the potential damage from that wrongdoing has little to do with whether or

The ongoing rollout of 5G networks around Australia won’t just make for much faster internet connections on our mobile devices – it is also set to pose an increasingly challenging test of the crisis communications capabilities of businesses and organisations. Speaking at a recent webinar on crisis communications hosted by media monitoring company Meltwater, international communications expert John Bailey said 5G capabilities would supercharge existing trends in our behaviour around disasters and noteworthy public incidents. Bailey, who has extensive experience working with airlines on crises responses, mapped out the evolution of social media around airline emergency situations in recent years. While the crash

The royal commission into the abuse of people with disability will be the most expensive in this country’s history, with $527 million budgeted for an inquiry that is expected to run for three years. It will also be Australia’s seventh royal commission in six years, as commissions  have become the ‘new normal’ when governments look to address significant issues in society. So, what do you need to know about the Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability, especially if you are a provider in the sector? What is the scope of the royal commission? Needless to say, with a three-year span, this commission’s scope is

The emergence of royal commissions as “everyday events”, the evolution of a clear commission “template” and the dire perils for businesses and organisations found by a commission to have acted dishonestly – those were some of the key takeaways from a joint event held in Perth by Cannings Purple and leading law firm Gilbert + Tobin. Against the backdrop of an ongoing Aged Care Royal Commission and a Federal Budget allocation of $528 million towards a royal commission into the mistreatment of people with disabilities, a lunchtime audience of business leaders heard from Cannings Purple National Director Karen Brown and G

The recent hacking of information from a specialist cardiology unit in Melbourne highlights the importance of being prepared in advance for a data breach – potentially even one that doesn’t belong to you. The January attack “scrambled” the files of some 15,000 patients at the Melbourne Heart Group (MHG) clinic, with a cryptocurrency demand issued for the return of information believed to have been obtained using malware from North Korea or Russia. Some patients’ information was reportedly still missing weeks later and the situation was made even more intriguing by the possible on-flow of reputational damage to a third party: Cabrini Hospital.

We live in a connected world where our personal information, if not protected properly, is easier to access than it has ever been. Often that access, uninvited as it might be, is harmless enough. But in some instances it crosses the line into the realm of a personal attack, which can be both emotionally and financially harmful. Recently, the perils of ‘doxxing’ have been put under a new spotlight, after an ABC journalist wrote about his experience of being ‘trolled’ en masse. So what exactly is doxxing and why should you be worried about it? Doxxing defined The term is derived from dox, which is an abbreviation of documents. Dropping

We live in an ever-changing communications landscape, where the next big trend can go from nowhere-to-be-seen to near ubiquitous in matter of days (or even hours). Against a recent backdrop in which public trust has been tested like never before (from Trump to banking horror stories and Australian cricket disgrace), our experts give their takes on the communication trends they expect to see coming into focus in the near future. Number crunching for the win One of the biggest opportunities – and challenges – for many businesses will be around how they use data and whether it can become a predictive tool for

An increase in malicious data attacks and more breaches than ever before – those are two of the standout aspects of a new batch of Notifiable Data Breach Scheme statistics revealed by the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner. The stats, covering 262 data breaches from October 1 through to December 31, mark the fourth quarterly report since the introduction of the scheme in February of last year. They highlight the ever-present prospect of malicious cyber-activity and the ubiquitous risk posed by human error. hbspt.cta.load(2597977, '63a914ce-52b1-4a76-a8f9-112ce0febc21', {}); Here are five key takeaways from the latest quarterly: 1. It was the busiest quarter ever: the

The Aged Care Royal Commission will hear from recipients of aged care and their families at each of its public hearings around the country.  For aged care providers this confirms that the next two years may see the industry dealing with a steady stream of bad news stories. The challenge for individual providers will be to maintain the confidence of their clients and other stakeholders while examples of abuse and sub-standard care are continuously brought to public attention. At the Royal Commission’s preliminary hearing in Adelaide, Commissioner Lynelle Briggs AO said there had been a “rising torrent” of concern that the aged

Australia’s top 100 aged care providers have been given until 7 January to respond to a list of detailed questions from the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety – with remaining providers expected to be given a further month. The Royal Commission is currently in the process of issuing letters to the top providers, asking for information including: views as to where the Royal Commission should focus its attention, including areas where change is required; more detailed data around complaints and instances of substandard care since 1 July 2013, their causes and the provider’s responses; the extent and nature

Late last month marked eight months since the introduction of Australia’s notifiable data breach laws.   The milestone passed without much fanfare. But don’t let that lack of publicity disguise the vital importance of the Notifiable Data Breach Scheme to your business – and most of all, don’t make the mistake of thinking a data breach is something that just happens to other people.   As Andrew Solomon, from the Office of the Australia Information Commissioner, told a Perth GRC Institute event recently - it’s far more a case of when rather than if your business will have to deal with a data breach.

Download our white paper on preparing for notifiable data breaches hbspt.cta.load(2597977, '63a914ce-52b1-4a76-a8f9-112ce0febc21', {});   With Australia’s notifiable data breach reporting rules now in place — and changes to European legislation looming — Design and Digital Director Jamie Wilkinson looks at what lessons we have learned so far. It’s been nearly three months since Australia’s new data breach laws came into place, and the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner has just published the first data regarding the number of notifiable breaches it received for the first quarter of 2018. It makes for interesting reading: There were 55 notifiable data breaches in March alone, and

How can Media Intelligence give you a jump on your competitors? We asked Sarah-Jane Dabarera what businesses need to know about monitoring their activity —  and that of others. Unless your company has been hiding under a rock, you will know there’s been a revolution in data in recent years. With regards to your organisation’s digital presence, information now exists on everything from instant analytics on your reach per tweet, to better alerts when your business gets a mention in the press. There is a wealth of information available which we call media intelligence. But data without analysis is just