Begin typing your search above and press return to search. Press Esc to cancel.

The Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC) recently released its Notifiable Data Breaches Report for the period from January to June 2021. The Notifiable Data Breaches (NDB) scheme was established in February 2018 to improve consumer protection and drive better security standards for protecting personal information. Just 446 data breaches were notified to the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC) under notifiable data breach (NDB) laws between January and June, a 16% decrease compared to the previous reporting period. With a reduced number of malicious data attacks and data breaches compared to the previous 6-month reporting period, the numbers are looking positive. Health sector

Most crises centre around a distinct or discrete event. An accident. A fatality. A failure of critical infrastructure. And although the details of the issue may not be immediately apparent, there is usually clarity around what has happened, or at least, the immediate impact of what has happened. In most cases then, managing a crisis, particularly the communications aspect, centres on what has happened, what is known, what happens next. It is stressful, and it can put severe pressure on teams, but usually the interest and engagement about the issue tends to die down after a day or two. There’s reputation rebuilding, and

Safer Internet Day is designed to encourage people to start the conversation around protecting ourselves, our families and our colleagues on the web, and this year's message is 'together for a better internet'. Protect your internet 'home' In my house, every day is safer internet day, but I can understand why this dry topic might not be everyone’s first priority. Presumably though, you would say you do everything you can to protect your home (and thus your family): door and window locks, alarms, garden fences, teaching your kids to close the front door, shutting your garage etc. Using the internet safely is just

There's a lot of noise on social channels right now from people who are switching from WhatsApp to other messaging services. The move seems to be driven by the (wrong) assertion that changes in WhatsApp’s user policies mean the app will begin pushing personalised information about you to its parent company, Facebook. Now, I’m not a huge supporter of Facebook’s grip on our personal data (or indeed what it has done with that data in the past), but the changes it is making do not mean your personal information will be any more compromised than it already is on WhatsApp -

Recently I was asked to speak in Sydney at the Corporate Affairs Summit, Australasia’s most senior and significant gathering of corporate affairs and communication executives. These events are always a perilous mix of unusual insight (this year a senior leader from tobacco company Philip Morris was the day one keynote speaker) and potential navel-gazing, as 300-plus communications professionals meet in the same room. But the panel I was on was particularly interesting, even if I do say so myself! I was asked to discuss the importance of authenticity in professional communications, especially with regards to large-scale consumer communications. This is a fascinating topic,

The recent hacking of information from a specialist cardiology unit in Melbourne highlights the importance of being prepared in advance for a data breach – potentially even one that doesn’t belong to you. The January attack “scrambled” the files of some 15,000 patients at the Melbourne Heart Group (MHG) clinic, with a cryptocurrency demand issued for the return of information believed to have been obtained using malware from North Korea or Russia. Some patients’ information was reportedly still missing weeks later and the situation was made even more intriguing by the possible on-flow of reputational damage to a third party: Cabrini Hospital.

We live in a connected world where our personal information, if not protected properly, is easier to access than it has ever been. Often that access, uninvited as it might be, is harmless enough. But in some instances it crosses the line into the realm of a personal attack, which can be both emotionally and financially harmful. Recently, the perils of ‘doxxing’ have been put under a new spotlight, after an ABC journalist wrote about his experience of being ‘trolled’ en masse. So what exactly is doxxing and why should you be worried about it? Doxxing defined The term is derived from dox, which is an abbreviation of documents. Dropping

An increase in malicious data attacks and more breaches than ever before – those are two of the standout aspects of a new batch of Notifiable Data Breach Scheme statistics revealed by the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner. The stats, covering 262 data breaches from October 1 through to December 31, mark the fourth quarterly report since the introduction of the scheme in February of last year. They highlight the ever-present prospect of malicious cyber-activity and the ubiquitous risk posed by human error. hbspt.cta.load(2597977, '63a914ce-52b1-4a76-a8f9-112ce0febc21', {}); Here are five key takeaways from the latest quarterly: 1. It was the busiest quarter ever: the

Richard Harris is one of our senior advisors and is one of Western Australia’s leading energy experts, with over 40-years’ experience in government and the private sector. As someone who oversaw the break-up of Western Power in 2005 and the creation of the Wholesale Energy Market in 2006, Richard has a structural understanding of the energy industry and the drivers that shape it. Here, interviewed by our Director of Design and Digital Jamie Wilkinson, Richard outlines the current challenges facing the energy sector and his view of the future.     

Download our white paper on preparing for notifiable data breaches hbspt.cta.load(2597977, '63a914ce-52b1-4a76-a8f9-112ce0febc21', {});   With Australia’s notifiable data breach reporting rules now in place — and changes to European legislation looming — Design and Digital Director Jamie Wilkinson looks at what lessons we have learned so far. It’s been nearly three months since Australia’s new data breach laws came into place, and the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner has just published the first data regarding the number of notifiable breaches it received for the first quarter of 2018. It makes for interesting reading: There were 55 notifiable data breaches in March alone, and