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One month has passed since the Federal Election, but while the dust is still settling, the political world hasn’t waited for Anthony Albanese to get comfortable in his new seat at the head of the table. Easing into the position and taking the time to find a groove were not options for the new Prime Minister, as Australia faced a seemingly endless onslaught of critical events and crises. June was the month that had ‘energy’ on everyone’s lips, as each state energy minister met as a gas crisis engulfed the east coast, sparking a resurgence of coal and nuclear power conversations. At the

Premier and Treasurer Mark McGowan has delivered another bumper budget, with a $5.7 billion surplus facilitating record healthcare investment and a one-off cost of living boost for Western Australians. But the real headline for any WA budget is always iron ore – and that has meant good news in the past couple of years for the McGowan Government. See also: 2022 WA budget fast facts Of the State’s $38.428 billion total forecast revenue for the upcoming 2022-23 financial year, revenue from iron ore royalties accounts for $5.645 billion. However, compared to the financial year about to end, this represents a significant decline in iron

Before we look forward to 2022-23, it’s also helpful to look back to what happened in 2021-22. That year’s budget forecast a surplus of $2.8 billion based on an iron ore price assumption of $121.30 per tonne. After a surplus of $5.8 billion in 2020-21, the 2021-22 surplus is estimated to come in ever so slightly lower at $5.7 billion. This figure is clearly well above the previous forecast mainly due to a higher than forecast iron ore price over the last year This resulted in net debt falling from $33 billion in 2020-21 to $30 billion in 2021-22. As Mr McGowan

As the worst economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic appear to be waning, the cost of living is coming into focus as the major issue facing Australians, potentially swinging their vote as the election approaches. But why are we finding it harder to make ends meet? Will things get better soon? And what can the Commonwealth government do to help ease the pressure? Well, as my old State Treasury colleagues would say: it’s complicated and it depends. Inflation creation Rising cost of living is generally synonymous with higher inflation.  But inflation has been fairly stable over the last five years with the Consumer

In any discussion around global warming and net-zero emissions, it seems inevitable that the term clean energy will be mentioned. And while it may seem overused, it is a notion we need to grasp on a national and global scale as we move toward the use of cleaner energy systems and attempt to extend the longevity of the planet. Why the focus on energy? The simple answer is, if we are to limit global warming by a total of 1.5 degrees, we must make deep cuts into our production of CO2 emissions. The energy sector is a massive emitter so if we are serious

Commonwealth Treasurer Josh Frydenberg and his Cabinet colleagues have squarely framed last night’s Federal Budget focus on addressing the rising cost of living pressures for all Australians. Regardless of when or why the switch to focus on cost of living happened, it is, as the Treasurer said on national radio on Tuesday, the single most significant discussion point in most voters’ lounge rooms as we head toward a likely May federal election. The massive defence and national security spending commitments associated with the previous khaki election focus, designed to distract from more troublesome domestic politics, still form a major component of the

Federal elections mean enticing voters with big promises and big spending. Our Pandemic Election will be no different in that sense, but vastly different in others. While we currently have no polling date, and the Federal Budget being handed down on 29 March, unofficial campaigning has begun for both parties. Policies regarding emission reduction targets, healthcare promises and, of course, the roadmap out of this never-ending pandemic have already been outlined. Every State and Territory have seats crucial to each party, and WA is absolutely no exception. Yet the West will play a unique role in this election, either assisting the

It's been 111 years since the first International Women's Day was celebrated, and while equality remains a priority, we still are struggling to close the gender gap. The day, celebrated around the world each March 8, is recognised as a day to celebrate social, economic, cultural, and political gains and achievements of women, while also signifying a call to action in accelerating gender parity and equality. The impetus for IWD began in the early 1900s, building on the 'radical ideologies’, unrest and critical debate that had seem women march and protest in major cities demanding voting rights, better pay, and equality before the

Democracy requires constant attention, and our system is no exception — even when the antics of sports stars, the wave of Omicron and a summer of bushfires and soaring temperatures are dominating headlines. In our third year of the pandemic, Australia will head to the polls to elect a Federal Government and in contrast to the 2019 election, a focus on jobs and growth may not be enough to win voters over. It will be a test for Scott Morrison, the first Prime Minister to run a full term in nearly a decade — no small achievement considering Australia has had seven

Christmas came early for many on the 13 December last year, when WA Premier Mark McGowan announced the State Government would embark on its “Safe Transition Plan” and ease hard border controls from 12.01am on February 5, 2022.  Families rejoiced, weddings were locked in and flights were booked. Business breathed a sigh of relief, plans were made and talent recruited.   But alas, 37 days later everything changed. Mr McGowan again fronted the media (this time in prime time) and announced that WA would live up to the name ‘Wait Awhile’ and would not be opening on February 5. That date sailed by

Cannings Purple had a big year in 2021; helping hundreds of clients achieve their strategic goals, welcoming many new members to our team, and even gaining international recognition at the 2021 Asia-Pacific SABRE awards. Tune in as a few of our team members reflect on their favourite projects from the last 12 months. Getting WA to the moon Our incoming Director of Corporate Affairs, Carina Tan-Van Baren, found it difficult to narrow it down to one project, but as a bit of a space-nerd, she couldn’t help but settle on working with Curtin University’s Space Science and Technology Centre to send WA's first

After defeating Scott Morrison in the 2019 election, Bill Shorten has had a lot on his plate with bushfires and pandemics but now, buoyed by Hillary Clinton’s second term win last November, his focus is shifting to the upcoming election. During the campaign he can be expected to point to a relatively strong local economy in the face of the pandemic. Hopefully, for the Labor party, this will be enough to help older voters forget their rage at the scrapping of franking credits last June. But, rather than sound economic management, Mr Shorten can thank strong pre-pandemic global trade and the strength

Navigating your path through government engagement on any project can be a daunting task. Between departments and agencies, ministers, policy advisers, public servants, industry groups and lobbyists, there are plenty of reasons why you might feel lost. While the Government Relations team at Cannings Purple is here to guide you through these engagements, it is important not to forget about engaging with the community. Here are three reasons why: Politicians expect it: When we meet with politicians to talk about clients’ project/issues, there’s one question we are inevitably asked: “have you spoken to the community?” If the answer is “yes” and you

Still riding high following March’s election landslide, Premier Mark McGowan today handed down his first Budget in his dual role as the State’s Treasurer. While most of the country remains in lockdown, and Western Australia may be locked to them, we’re anything but down. The surplus is in a word, up, and all economic indicators have improved since the 20-21 Budget.  In handing down the Budget, Premier McGowan took the opportunity to remind us, that ours is not only the strongest economy in Australia, but one of the strongest in the world.   With this Budget, he outlined his plans to reinvest some of the windfalls of the past year in the State’s future services and infrastructure.  An ironclad result  WA reported a massive surplus of $5.6 billion in 2020-21, $4.4 billion more than forecast in the previous Budget.   Everyone knows money doesn’t grow on trees, but as every Western Australian does know, it is dug out

Splitting the bill isn’t what it used to be.   Not so long ago, the end of a dinner out with friends would be a cue to scramble for an ATM, dig deep for notes and coins, and write an IOU to settle the evening’s expenses.  Now it is more likely one person will pay the bill and the rest will send their share through an online banking transaction that might land with the payer in a few days.  And it’s not just restaurants.  Australians are well versed with electronic money, with most people familiar with online banking, e-commerce and tap-and-go – and thanks to COVID-19, many of us don’t carry any physical cash at all.    So what if we did away

The resource sector is set to have a significant bureaucratic burden lifted, as the Western Australian Government shapes reforms to the Mining Act 1978 (WA) to streamline its approvals processes. The Streamlining (Mining Amendment) Bill 2021 (WA) (Bill) was initiated to cut red tape and encourage economic activity in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Not only does the draft legislation aim to save the need for reams of documentation, it also seeks to: Provide a system for instantaneous approvals for ‘low impact’ mechanised ground disturbance activity; Create greater clarity for tenement holders and government officials regarding the relevant approvals and conditions

We all know how Western Australia has become one of the safest places to live and best performing economies in the world because of our competent handling of the pandemic and being able to keep our resources production going. But we now have the chance to move from being predominantly a mining and resource state – at the mercy of volatile commodity prices – to becoming an advanced manufacturing centre, and even key decision makers in government are seeing this as our once in a generation opportunity. Yes, the way we have managed the pandemic is certainly a plus when global manufacturing

“It was the first time I felt respected” – the words of a 60-year-old Aboriginal man who had spent many years living on the streets of Perth. He made the comment after he and other residents at a transitional accommodation centre in Perth had the opportunity to have a yarn with Premier Mark McGowan following an announcement of additional funding for homelessness at the start of the election campaign last year. Aboriginal people make up about 40 per cent of the street homeless population, so as the organiser of an event for this transitional accommodation centre, I wanted to ensure that some

Josh Frydenberg’s third Budget dropped this week with all the hype of a new record. In musical circles artists tend to branch out creatively on their third album, diverting from the mainstream and even their own genre to try new things. The Treasurer appears to be doing just that with the 2021-22 Budget. More funding has been directed to social policies rather than economic policies and this Budget shuns the traditional Liberal pursuit of surplus to focus on spending, job creation and stimulus. Politically, it has captured traditional Labor policy space, making it hard for the Opposition to attack it in the

WA continues to lead the COVID-19 recovery - with all jobs lost due to the pandemic now recovered and a further 20,000 jobs created. There are more than 1.4 million Western Australians now employed - the highest result on record. Employers need skilled workers  They are searching for sous chefs in Kununurra. They can’t get enough mechanics in Kal. And in the Great Southern, there’s a desperate need for farm workers, labourers, carpenters, waiters — anyone, really.   The fears of an economic depression and mass unemployment a year ago suddenly seems overblown as WA enters a skill-shortage not seen since the days of the last mining boom.   The reasons behind

In the unusual setting of the Parliament House Dining Room, Premier Mark McGowan gathered his re-elected and newly minted, parliamentary Labor colleagues yesterday. It was not a post-run kebab on the menu, but the first caucus meeting’s main task was to decide the make-up of Mr McGowan’s new Cabinet. Smiles all round as Labor held its first caucus meeting since its election win (ABC News: Hugh Sando) Obviously, Mr McGowan remains at the head of the table as Premier, with Roger Cook staying at his right hand as Deputy. The special of the day was the Treasurer’s role with Roger Cook and Rita

Waking up yesterday I needed to remind myself of the occasion, as it has been a remarkably calm lead-up to political decision day 2021. There has been comparatively little tension in the contest this time around on all fronts – the policy debate, the personal attacks and even the politically engaged media have all lacked energy. A quick drive around suburbia on Saturday morning did nothing much to excite me either, the usual sign positioning battles over night must have also been a weak affair, as volumes of paraphernalia and rusted on volunteers appeared to have scaled to match the downsized turnout. A

There’s an African proverb that when elephants fight, it’s the grass that suffers — and that’s been abundantly clear for Australian media in the past few weeks.   Facebook vs News Corp In the blue corner is Facebook, market capitalisation of USD $741 billion, with as many daily users as the entire populations of all of North America, Europe and Latin America combined.   In the red corner is News Corp, a mere $10 billion in market capitalisation, but in charge of a sprawling international TV, news, digital and magazine empire that in Australia extends from Sky News to The Australian to the Fremantle-Cockburn Gazette.   Alongside are Australia’s other big news houses: Nine, which owns

For many, the idea of stepping on to a stage or standing before a group of peers to make a presentation is nearly worse than death. Some might even believe it really is worse than death! And to heighten anxiety and frustration, seeing someone else standing there, seemingly relaxed and delivering with certainty and clarity to a completely captivated audience, just makes your own shortcomings so much more real. Where are their nerves? How is this person so calm, while I am struggling the get even the simplest sentence out? A duck in a pond Delivering a presentation or speech is a little like

Facebook has made the unprecedented move of banning Australian news publishers (and users) from sharing or viewing any news articles on the platform. It’s a response to the Federal Government’s bargaining code which has passed through the House of Representatives, and which will require social media companies to pay news organisations if their content appears on the platform. For many Australian users, this means their main source of daily news - their Facebook newsfeed - will look very different, with only content appearing from friends and family, and non-news organisations. It’s a bold, even aggressive action, on Facebook’s part. If you look at

Google is threatening to shut down its search engine in Australia over a proposed media law. Google said last month that it may stop delivering search results in Australia after the government introduced a new media bill that requires digital platforms to pay publishers to link their content in news feeds or search results. Essentially, Australia wants internet giants like Facebook and Google, to pay to display and link to news generated by Australian journalists. If Google does exit from Australia, it would deny more than 25 million people access to the world's most popular search engine, which handles almost 95% of the country's daily

In between her very busy schedule, heading our organisation and its teams, Cannings Purple’s Managing Director, Annette Ellis takes a break to tell us who she is when she's not working. In our ‘Purple Conversations’ series, you’ll find out about the Cannings Purple team – what led them to their careers; what they do in their spare time and even what their favourite apps are. Meet Annette With more than 25 years experience in corporate communications, reputation management, crisis communications, change management and stakeholder relations, Annette is an accomplished corporate editor, speechwriter and a highly regarded coach in executive presentation skills. Annette gained her

With January now behind us, the WA State election is squarely in view. As candidates from all political persuasions prepare for the final push towards the March 13 finish line, executive government is gearing up for a different shift - the transition into caretaker mode. What is caretaker? Caretaker government starts when the parliament is dissolved and lasts until the election result is clear. During this period, the government is bound by a number of conventions to uphold responsible government. In particular, these rules govern some key aspects of our government. One eye on the horizon Key contracts and commitments, as well as