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With consumption of news at an all time high in Australia, there would be few in business that underestimate the importance of a positive interaction with the media.  But at the same time, news organisations and journalists remain in the unenviable ranks of the most untrusted professions in the country, making those media interactions even more crucial when it comes to a maintaining a company’s good reputation.  Some would say the media mistrust is simply a by-product of the age of social media and self-publishing, where false information is often weaponised as ‘fake news’, and opposing viewpoints are easily dismissed as political

If asked to complete this sentence: “Public speaking is…” you might not be surprised to find that “worse than death” is a common response.  For many it is the number one fear and a phobia – one by the name of glossophobia, actually – that ranks ahead of the fear of snakes or heights.  What might surprise you however is to discover how many famous people, including politicians like Sir Winston Churchill or actors like Laurence Olivier and Nicole Kidman, hated public speaking. Fear of public speaking is not ideal for people in these positions but of course they had little choice

With smartphone technology now a ubiquitous part of modern life, it can be easy to forget that everyone is carrying a camera and a microphone.   And as our reliance on smartphones has grown, it has become even easier to forget when it might be operating, and who might be listening.   It is a phenomenon that can catch out even the savviest media professionals and politicians with their droves of media advisors; despite all their experience and knowledge, sometimes they are still exposed by what is known in the industry as a ‘hot mic’.   What is a hot mic?   Hot mic moments occur when a device captures statements, often offensive or insensitive, which are not intended to be recorded or broadcast.    Add in a camera and there is no hiding; a minor slip-up or

For many, the idea of stepping on to a stage or standing before a group of peers to make a presentation is nearly worse than death. Some might even believe it really is worse than death! And to heighten anxiety and frustration, seeing someone else standing there, seemingly relaxed and delivering with certainty and clarity to a completely captivated audience, just makes your own shortcomings so much more real. Where are their nerves? How is this person so calm, while I am struggling the get even the simplest sentence out? A duck in a pond Delivering a presentation or speech is a little like

As we embark on 2021, the world finds itself at a major turning point – politically, economically, technologically and socially. What’s next? It’s never easy to predict, and especially so this year! For businesses and communication experts, the best way forward is to reflect and learn from the year that was – the lockdown; the economic and social impacts; the devastating bushfires; the disruption of everyday life. The events of 2020 transformed how we communicate. We asked some of Perth’s best communication experts to look back on 2020 and give us their predictions for 2021. A purpose-driven focus With lots of social justice issues

The emergence of royal commissions as “everyday events”, the evolution of a clear commission “template” and the dire perils for businesses and organisations found by a commission to have acted dishonestly – those were some of the key takeaways from a joint event held in Perth by Cannings Purple and leading law firm Gilbert + Tobin. Against the backdrop of an ongoing Aged Care Royal Commission and a Federal Budget allocation of $528 million towards a royal commission into the mistreatment of people with disabilities, a lunchtime audience of business leaders heard from Cannings Purple National Director Karen Brown and G

Clients - and colleagues - often ask me how I go about pitching ideas, talent and content to media organisations. I am fortunate in that I have spent more than 20 years in newsrooms in Australia and the UK and I have a strong network of contacts and a detailed appreciation for how news outlets work, what types of stories are likely to gain traction and what deadlines are applicable to different organisations. But I still go back to one basic premise every time I make a pitch: DRILL Do you know? What is your story? Why is it a story? What collateral do you

Facebook’s woes have been well covered in recent months, not least here on The 268. The #deletefacebook movement might not have brought down the world’s largest social network (yet), but if you are looking for a different platform to share your digital self, our social and digital media expert Dennis McDougall has some options. WeChat WeChat is massive. Globally, it has more users than Instagram, but with most of them in Asia, it doesn’t get much love elsewhere in the world. 41% of China logs in to WeChat every day. It’s a multi-purpose messaging and social media app and includes features such as