Begin typing your search above and press return to search. Press Esc to cancel.

One month has passed since the Federal Election, but while the dust is still settling, the political world hasn’t waited for Anthony Albanese to get comfortable in his new seat at the head of the table. Easing into the position and taking the time to find a groove were not options for the new Prime Minister, as Australia faced a seemingly endless onslaught of critical events and crises. June was the month that had ‘energy’ on everyone’s lips, as each state energy minister met as a gas crisis engulfed the east coast, sparking a resurgence of coal and nuclear power conversations. At the

Following the Federal Election, incoming Prime Minister Anthony Albanese’s immediate commitment to the Uluru Statement from the Heart and this year’s National Reconciliation Week theme of Be Brave, Make Change have brought into sharp focus the priority business and governments have placed on closing the gap between our First Nation peoples and non-indigenous Australians. But how often do we see this commitment translate into meaningful action? In his opening address at the WA launch of National Reconciliation Week, Western Australia’s Aboriginal Affairs Minister Tony Buti spoke of the Aboriginal Empowerment Strategy and his government’s commitment to better outcomes for Aboriginal people in

Premier and Treasurer Mark McGowan has delivered another bumper budget, with a $5.7 billion surplus facilitating record healthcare investment and a one-off cost of living boost for Western Australians. But the real headline for any WA budget is always iron ore – and that has meant good news in the past couple of years for the McGowan Government. See also: 2022 WA budget fast facts Of the State’s $38.428 billion total forecast revenue for the upcoming 2022-23 financial year, revenue from iron ore royalties accounts for $5.645 billion. However, compared to the financial year about to end, this represents a significant decline in iron

Before we look forward to 2022-23, it’s also helpful to look back to what happened in 2021-22. That year’s budget forecast a surplus of $2.8 billion based on an iron ore price assumption of $121.30 per tonne. After a surplus of $5.8 billion in 2020-21, the 2021-22 surplus is estimated to come in ever so slightly lower at $5.7 billion. This figure is clearly well above the previous forecast mainly due to a higher than forecast iron ore price over the last year This resulted in net debt falling from $33 billion in 2020-21 to $30 billion in 2021-22. As Mr McGowan

As the worst economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic appear to be waning, the cost of living is coming into focus as the major issue facing Australians, potentially swinging their vote as the election approaches. But why are we finding it harder to make ends meet? Will things get better soon? And what can the Commonwealth government do to help ease the pressure? Well, as my old State Treasury colleagues would say: it’s complicated and it depends. Inflation creation Rising cost of living is generally synonymous with higher inflation.  But inflation has been fairly stable over the last five years with the Consumer

Bored Apes are 2022’s hottest thing in crypto - but what are they, and why are they selling for millions of dollars? Sometime around April last year, a series of gaudily illustrated anthropomorphic monkeys started creating something of a buzz on social media. As we lurch towards the midway point of 2022, it’s fair to say that buzz has amplified into a virtual cacophonic rumble, as Bored Apes have swiftly become some of the most sought after - and most valuable - forms of modern art. At launch, owning a Bored Ape would have set you back just less than $US200. Not that

Cannings Purple’s investor relations publication Investor Insight reflects on a turbulent first quarter, and takes stock of the performance of the ‘Investor Insight 20’ – a basket of 20 ASX-listed companies spread across the resources, technology and property sectors. The first quarter of this year has thrown up far more surprises than two years of a pandemic managed. A long-anticipated market correction in January following an incredible bull run in 2021 wiped about 10% from equity markets before the fast-spreading Omicron variant caused renewed headaches for businesses emerging from long lockdowns. And then Russia’s invasion of the Ukraine ratcheted up market volatility to a whole

Commonwealth Treasurer Josh Frydenberg and his Cabinet colleagues have squarely framed last night’s Federal Budget focus on addressing the rising cost of living pressures for all Australians. Regardless of when or why the switch to focus on cost of living happened, it is, as the Treasurer said on national radio on Tuesday, the single most significant discussion point in most voters’ lounge rooms as we head toward a likely May federal election. The massive defence and national security spending commitments associated with the previous khaki election focus, designed to distract from more troublesome domestic politics, still form a major component of the

Why are Australians taking the plunge, and what do we need to do to make it work? As investors plunge headfirst into the deep end of cryptocurrency, Australia is facing a crypto conundrum with the sector continuing to be plagued by credibility and respectability issues. But whether you’re a fan or sceptic there’s nothing escaping the fact that crypto is here to stay. The Commonwealth Government’s Senate Inquiry into the regulatory environment for cryptocurrency chaired by Senator Andrew Bragg, assessed the legitimacy of the crypto market and its potential for growth. Bragg concluded that crypto is predicted to generate as much as

It's been 111 years since the first International Women's Day was celebrated, and while equality remains a priority, we still are struggling to close the gender gap. The day, celebrated around the world each March 8, is recognised as a day to celebrate social, economic, cultural, and political gains and achievements of women, while also signifying a call to action in accelerating gender parity and equality. The impetus for IWD began in the early 1900s, building on the 'radical ideologies’, unrest and critical debate that had seem women march and protest in major cities demanding voting rights, better pay, and equality before the

TikTok is much more than a dancing app for Gen Z’ers. The Chinese social media platform, developed from popular lip-syncing app Music.ly, has captured the hearts and minds of over one billion monthly users and become a must-have platform for businesses striving for the attention of the younger market. TikTok is a treasure trove of bite-sized content which, thanks to its clever algorithm, is tailored to you and your interests. Who’s using it? With people locked inside their homes, TikTok became the behemoth it is today, providing much needed reprieve from the pandemic and making those living in isolation feel less alone. Despite TikTok openly

Putting together a big project is tricky enough — but pulling together a team of contractors who might not have worked together before? That is where the real challenge begins. Why it matters In project management, effective communications can make or break successful outcomes. Project teams are commonly a team of contractors from across the organisation as well as external agencies. The need to wrangle the entire project team can see communications become the core of operations. A common misconception is that the shared goal of completing the project means that all stakeholders are automatically on the same page when it comes to how

Democracy requires constant attention, and our system is no exception — even when the antics of sports stars, the wave of Omicron and a summer of bushfires and soaring temperatures are dominating headlines. In our third year of the pandemic, Australia will head to the polls to elect a Federal Government and in contrast to the 2019 election, a focus on jobs and growth may not be enough to win voters over. It will be a test for Scott Morrison, the first Prime Minister to run a full term in nearly a decade — no small achievement considering Australia has had seven

You and I have changed the face of the Earth. For centuries humans have thrived in a throwaway economy, where the unquestioned mentality of we want, we take, we use and then we discard has been embedded into our expectations of everyday convenience. Once falling into the buzz word category, ‘circular economy’ has crept into our vocabulary, strategic plans and conversation as we become increasingly aware of our reliance on the world’s ecosystems in recent years.   Our use of the world’s resources is linear in nature, where materials flow in a straight line – from extraction to design, manufacturing, consumption, and

Christmas came early for many on the 13 December last year, when WA Premier Mark McGowan announced the State Government would embark on its “Safe Transition Plan” and ease hard border controls from 12.01am on February 5, 2022.  Families rejoiced, weddings were locked in and flights were booked. Business breathed a sigh of relief, plans were made and talent recruited.   But alas, 37 days later everything changed. Mr McGowan again fronted the media (this time in prime time) and announced that WA would live up to the name ‘Wait Awhile’ and would not be opening on February 5. That date sailed by

Premier Mark McGowan has advised Western Australians of his action plan for when the State hits inevitable ‘high caseload’ of COVID-19 cases, with a Friday afternoon press conference outlining a series of complex changes.  The detail-heavy guide will apply once WA hits a high caseload, he warned, but said it was too early to define what a high caseload is, drawing a distinction between large numbers in the community while infectious and similar or larger numbers who might be infected while in isolation.   “There is no hard number of cases that define what a high caseload environment is,” he told the media.   “It

With smartphone technology now a ubiquitous part of modern life, it can be easy to forget that everyone is carrying a camera and a microphone.   And as our reliance on smartphones has grown, it has become even easier to forget when it might be operating, and who might be listening.   It is a phenomenon that can catch out even the savviest media professionals and politicians with their droves of media advisors; despite all their experience and knowledge, sometimes they are still exposed by what is known in the industry as a ‘hot mic’.   What is a hot mic?   Hot mic moments occur when a device captures statements, often offensive or insensitive, which are not intended to be recorded or broadcast.    Add in a camera and there is no hiding; a minor slip-up or

It could be surprising to learn that Australia Day has only been officially celebrated on January 26 for just over three decades, even though it has been 252 years since Captain James Cook first raised the Union Jack to signal the beginning of the Australian colony in August 1770.  In that context, the 34 years since January 26 was named the official date of Australia Day celebrations in 1988 represents a very short period of time.  The first Australia Day celebration was held on July 30 in 1915 to raise money for the war effort. In 1916, it was changed to July

Even in the most positive jobs market in memory, attending a job interview can be a daunting experience. You enter an unfamiliar environment, unclear about what you might be asked, who you’ll be facing or how long you might be there. You need to prepare for a grilling in case there’s little time between questions for reflection. It’s a high-stress environment, where every mistake or slip-up counts, with performance anxiety getting in the way of what you really have to offer. Is there a better way? Well, the pandemic suggests that might be the case. Reinventing the interview process Back in 2018, LinkedIn looked at

Remember the days where Australia’s COVID-19 cases hovered between the 1,000 to 2,000 mark? You should because that was a few weeks ago.  How long ago that now seems.   At the time of writing, Australia had just reached a record, nearing 100,000 positive COVID-19 test results recorded nationally in 24 hours. But even that figure is merely an estimate, with thousands being turned away as testing clinics reach capacity each day within just a few hours of opening.   By the time you’re reading this, it’s not an exaggeration to assume that figure has probably doubled.  In fact, we have gone from almost nothing six

Cannings Purple had a big year in 2021; helping hundreds of clients achieve their strategic goals, welcoming many new members to our team, and even gaining international recognition at the 2021 Asia-Pacific SABRE awards. Tune in as a few of our team members reflect on their favourite projects from the last 12 months. Getting WA to the moon Our incoming Director of Corporate Affairs, Carina Tan-Van Baren, found it difficult to narrow it down to one project, but as a bit of a space-nerd, she couldn’t help but settle on working with Curtin University’s Space Science and Technology Centre to send WA's first

And just like that, the fake world causes a brand crisis in the real world and maybe another small step into the Metaverse. On December 9, the first episodes of Sex and the City reboot “And Just Like That…” were released on HBO, and ranked as HBO Max’s best debut day of any series. The show was another in a series of reboots of much-loved TV programs that have come back to life … often with mixed results. Still, the incredible ratings were great news for HBO but unfortunate for popular high-end indoor exercise bike company, Peloton. What does a fitness company have to

Almost all the branding talks, books and experts cover business-to-consumer (B2C) branding. It’s sometimes difficult to look at the preferred examples from brands like Apple, Google, Hertz, Nike and the like – and work out how to apply the ideas and principles from a global consumer audience into a business-to-business (B2B) company. What makes B2C branding different? So, aside from the enormous budget, the scale of their advertising and access to the world’s leading design and advertising agencies – what makes B2C brands different from B2B brands? Branding is about an experience, and I would argue that what makes one brand different from the

This has never been seen before in its 93-year-long history, and is an opportunity only made possible by Fortescue Metals Group (FMG). These helicopters have been specifically designed to adjust their purpose depending on the mission - such as search and rescue, firefighting, medical evacuations, or even police and federal roles, and the Royal Flying Doctor Service WA (RFDS WA) now finds itself in possession of two of them. The RFDS WA can proudly introduce two new EC-145 helicopters to their collection, allowing them to further the level of care available for their patients in critical conditions. In addition to this,

For most companies, Christmas can feel like the final sprint to a well-deserved break. But don’t be fooled into thinking your communications can take a holiday over Christmas – clear and frequent communication over the break can lead to some jolly results in the new year.    We called upon a few of our experts to share their top tips and tricks for handling the lead up to the festive season, and to discuss how you and your team can maximise your engagement over the break.  Spreading Christmas C.H.E.E.R Digital Account Manager, Cameron Wong says the secret to successful Christmas content being clear in your messaging and communicating often with your audience.  “The Christmas period is all about spreading C.H.E.E.R – Clear messaging, Helpful

After defeating Scott Morrison in the 2019 election, Bill Shorten has had a lot on his plate with bushfires and pandemics but now, buoyed by Hillary Clinton’s second term win last November, his focus is shifting to the upcoming election. During the campaign he can be expected to point to a relatively strong local economy in the face of the pandemic. Hopefully, for the Labor party, this will be enough to help older voters forget their rage at the scrapping of franking credits last June. But, rather than sound economic management, Mr Shorten can thank strong pre-pandemic global trade and the strength

Branding and rebranding is often thought of as a sale-driving or marketing objective. But it’s so much more than that. Branding is communication, and communication is about people. Rebrand inside out Creating a new logo and visual identity can attract attention and create interest but unless you have a clear reason why you’re rebranding, your brand won’t feel authentic or cohesive. For example, when someone around you changes abruptly without telling you why – it feels jarring, and can build distrust: “I thought I knew this brand! Now I’m not sure”. A new name alone is definitely not going to help Facebook fix its

We recently announced some important changes to our Board and executive team. National Director Karen Brown, who has been with Cannings Purple for more than seven years and is set to retire at the end of this year, has accepted the role of Board Chair with effect from 1 February 2022, when our co-founder and current Chair, Warrick Hazeldine, will step down. With a growing portfolio of directorships and his private equity advisory service requiring more of his attention, Warrick has decided to step away from the demands of chairing the State’s largest communications firm. “Now is the right time for me to

Australia is undergoing a social and economic experiment that will rival the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic. After more than 18 months of measures designed to curb and crush the virus, some states have conceded it is nigh on impossible to suppress the virulent Delta strain — and that ‘living with the virus’ is the path forward. For WA, watching this unfold east of the rabbit-proof fence, with no restrictions or masks, and little fear, there are lessons to be learned: not only about what could happen if the virus re-enters the State, but about how businesses, government and institutions

Last month, the WA Government confirmed it will have one of the broadest vaccine mandates in the country, covering an estimated million workers and building on earlier requirements for all health, hotel quarantine, aged care and port workers to be vaccinated. The new measures identify two groups of employees and industries that will need to be vaccinated to ensure critical services can be delivered. The first group — high risk occupations — includes healthcare workers, emergency services personnel, mine site workers and pharmacists, dentists and meat workers, among others, who now have a range of deadlines for double vaccination, all by January 1