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In any discussion around global warming and net-zero emissions, it seems inevitable that the term clean energy will be mentioned. And while it may seem overused, it is a notion we need to grasp on a national and global scale as we move toward the use of cleaner energy systems and attempt to extend the longevity of the planet. Why the focus on energy? The simple answer is, if we are to limit global warming by a total of 1.5 degrees, we must make deep cuts into our production of CO2 emissions. The energy sector is a massive emitter so if we are serious

Why are Australians taking the plunge, and what do we need to do to make it work? As investors plunge headfirst into the deep end of cryptocurrency, Australia is facing a crypto conundrum with the sector continuing to be plagued by credibility and respectability issues. But whether you’re a fan or sceptic there’s nothing escaping the fact that crypto is here to stay. The Commonwealth Government’s Senate Inquiry into the regulatory environment for cryptocurrency chaired by Senator Andrew Bragg, assessed the legitimacy of the crypto market and its potential for growth. Bragg concluded that crypto is predicted to generate as much as

It's been 111 years since the first International Women's Day was celebrated, and while equality remains a priority, we still are struggling to close the gender gap. The day, celebrated around the world each March 8, is recognised as a day to celebrate social, economic, cultural, and political gains and achievements of women, while also signifying a call to action in accelerating gender parity and equality. The impetus for IWD began in the early 1900s, building on the 'radical ideologies’, unrest and critical debate that had seem women march and protest in major cities demanding voting rights, better pay, and equality before the

Democracy requires constant attention, and our system is no exception — even when the antics of sports stars, the wave of Omicron and a summer of bushfires and soaring temperatures are dominating headlines. In our third year of the pandemic, Australia will head to the polls to elect a Federal Government and in contrast to the 2019 election, a focus on jobs and growth may not be enough to win voters over. It will be a test for Scott Morrison, the first Prime Minister to run a full term in nearly a decade — no small achievement considering Australia has had seven

Even in the most positive jobs market in memory, attending a job interview can be a daunting experience. You enter an unfamiliar environment, unclear about what you might be asked, who you’ll be facing or how long you might be there. You need to prepare for a grilling in case there’s little time between questions for reflection. It’s a high-stress environment, where every mistake or slip-up counts, with performance anxiety getting in the way of what you really have to offer. Is there a better way? Well, the pandemic suggests that might be the case. Reinventing the interview process Back in 2018, LinkedIn looked at

As Australia faces record levels of debt and deficit in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, Western Australian Treasurer Ben Wyatt today bucked the trend to post a $1.2 billion surplus in the State Budget, followed by surpluses in the range of $363 million in 2021-2022 to $1.5 billion in 2023-2024. Buoyed by high iron ore prices, which enabled Western Australia to bank $8.4 billion in royalties in 2019/20, the coffers are well placed to support the State’s economic recovery and combat the ongoing threat of the coronavirus. The Budget assumes that Western Australia’s borders will remain closed until April 2021. Importantly,

I got my first iPhone (the 3GS) in 2009. At the time, it felt like taking a quantum leap from what had been a fairly boring world of same-same mobile (as opposed to smart) phones. I remember the excitement of leaving the Motorolas and Sony Ericssons and Nokias behind, and embracing what looked like a thrilling new future of productivity and connectivity. It’s now more than a decade on, and I’ve stayed loyal to Apple, becoming more and more entrenched in its ecosystem.  But I’ve also become aware that by only using one type of phone from one provider and for

The emergence of royal commissions as “everyday events”, the evolution of a clear commission “template” and the dire perils for businesses and organisations found by a commission to have acted dishonestly – those were some of the key takeaways from a joint event held in Perth by Cannings Purple and leading law firm Gilbert + Tobin. Against the backdrop of an ongoing Aged Care Royal Commission and a Federal Budget allocation of $528 million towards a royal commission into the mistreatment of people with disabilities, a lunchtime audience of business leaders heard from Cannings Purple National Director Karen Brown and G

The Federal Budget provides the first surplus in more than a decade and made headlines for generous tax cuts, cash handouts and infrastructure spending. But how much did it actually deliver for WA and Western Australians? GST Firstly, addressing a long-standing priority, rules around the $69 billion GST revenue distribution to the states have changed, with WA the main beneficiary in this year’s Budget. Our total payment has risen from $9.8 billion to $11.1 billion. While the change is welcome, the Budget unfortunately also forecasts a $10 billion downturn in overall GST revenue, triggered by the property downturn in Sydney and Melbourne. So

At the age of only 30, Kyle McGinn MLC has already lived in four states, prepared meals for masses on the oceans, been elected to represent the vast Mining and Pastoral Region and given WA Parliament a splash of colour with his choice of suits. The former chef-turned-Labor MP sat down with Cannings Purple’s Peter Klinger to talk about his passion for workers’ rights, the biggest issues affecting his electorate and how his political aspirations were shaped in kitchens – both on the mainland and at sea. Unfiltered, unguarded and sometimes unconventional, The Bench shows WA’s politicians as you’ve never seen them before. Home of the boxing crocodile Kyle McGinn talks

Divorce is expensive. Wouldn’t you rather spend money on improving your relationship and having fun? Our friend, health scientist and TEDxPerth speaker Amanda Lambros, discusses why you need to make time in your relationship for dates and how spending $2500 a year on two outings a month can save your relationship. At Cannings Purple, we put family and relationships first and know that a happy environment helps deliver the best results for our clients. Trust us, Amanda’s message is worth watching.