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It may look, smell, and walk like a database but your stakeholder database can be so much more than that.  Here are some simple reasons why you should start looking at your database differently and appreciating it for what it really can be.  It’s your record Well, of course – right? A database, by its very nature, is a record system. But it’s more than just a box-ticking exercise. It’s a permanent and evolving reference of every interaction you have had with your stakeholders. You’ll be forever grateful for the perfect database when it’s easy to track not only what you did and

In the big picture, NAIDOC Week is a national and annual event during which Australia celebrates Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, cultures and communities and recognises the valuable contributions they make to our country. On a more personal level, the week presents the opportunity for my community to showcase and share our rich and diverse culture with pride – celebrating together as Aboriginal people and choosing to open our arms and encourage others to participate and understand our value. NAIDOC Co-Chair Pat Thompson says Indigenous Australians seek recognition of their unique place in Australian history and society today. “For generations, Aboriginal and

In keeping with the theme of Reconciliation Week, this year’s Reconciliation WA breakfast - the largest breakfast event ever hosted at Crown Towers - was very much “grounded in truth.” With 1350 people in attendance, the morning started with a unique energy in the air, not least because this was to be the first public address made by newly-appointed Indigenous Affairs Minister, the Hon. Ken Wyatt, the first Indigenous person to take this responsibility. High-profile journalist Narelda Jacobs hosted the proceedings, with Noongar Elder and respected community member Dr Richard Walley delivering a powerful Welcome to Country, setting the tone for the

According to Industry Capability Network (ICN) data, there has been a near 50 per cent increase in the number of Indigenous businesses since 2013. There is no denying that the demand to work with or hire Indigenous people is on the rise, but that doesn’t tell the full story. Different structures, policies and how non-Indigenous businesses go about engaging Indigenous people, employees or businesses are impacting on successful Indigenous employment. With Reconciliation Week around the corner, I think it is timely to reflect on what this means for us in the corporate sector. Like many in the community, I feel encouraged by

Telstra chairman John Mullen touched on a variety of issues when he spoke at the Australian Institute of Company Directors’ Rottnest Forum recently – covering everything from the attainability and practicalities of work-life balance to the limitations of the minimum wage. But the subject that struck the biggest chord with me was the damage that can be done to a business’ reputation by a small percentage of unhappy customers or stakeholders. As Mullen highlighted, a business doesn’t have to deliberately do something wrong to create significant reputational issues. Equally, the potential damage from that wrongdoing has little to do with whether or

The concept of social licence to operate has a lot of currency in the resources sector. Increasingly resource companies see their social licence to operate as a strategic issue for the board, central to their success, with loss of social licence a key business risk. Social licence is, however, a relatively new concept, and emerged just over 20 years ago. First used by Canadian mining executive James Cooney in discussion with World Bank officials, it was originally coined as a metaphor to argue that the trust and acceptance of society was just as important as a regulatory licence for resource operations. The concept

With a Federal Election now confirmed for May 18, it’s time to consider what can or can’t happen during the caretaker period and what it means to you. The caretaker period starts at the time the House of Representatives is dissolved and remains in place until the election result is clear – either the incumbent party retaining power, or in the case where there is to be a change of government, until the new government is appointed by the Governor-General. The caretaker period reflects that (with Parliament dissolved) the government cannot be held accountable for its actions in the usual manner and that the autonomy of

An interesting thought struck me when I attended the 10th annual WA Major Projects Conference in Perth last week. In the nine previous editions of the conference it was the projects themselves and the process of building them that took centre stage. Over the years this covered everything from the biggest iron ore and LNG projects to major government undertakings like Optus Stadium and Elizabeth Quay. It’s not as if WA doesn’t have large-scale projects currently underway. BHP’s South Flank development was the topic of one session last week and the likes of METRONET, the Perth Airport upgrade, Northlink and the Westport strategy were also strongly featured. But my

We live in an ever-changing communications landscape, where the next big trend can go from nowhere-to-be-seen to near ubiquitous in matter of days (or even hours). Against a recent backdrop in which public trust has been tested like never before (from Trump to banking horror stories and Australian cricket disgrace), our experts give their takes on the communication trends they expect to see coming into focus in the near future. Number crunching for the win One of the biggest opportunities – and challenges – for many businesses will be around how they use data and whether it can become a predictive tool for

Traditional owners and knowledge holders could have a greater role in decision-making for heritage places to which they have a connection, with proposed changes to the WA Aboriginal Heritage Act released by Aboriginal Affairs Minister Ben Wyatt last week. New definitions for heritage and a clearer framework for land use proposals are just some of the changes discussed in the paper, which would likely see the 47-year-old Act repealed and replaced with a new approach to protecting and preserving heritage. It is a move that has been widely supported within Aboriginal communities. The role of traditional owners would increase through the establishment

Think of a residential estate and what does your mind turn to? Manicured lawns and new builds? Landscaped open space? Kids kicking a ball on gently curving roads? What about an opportunity to tackle one of society’s greatest social and health challenges? That’s the unlikely challenge that arises out of a growing body of research that finds badly-designed urban environments — anonymous high-rise living, for example, or so-called food deserts where all shops are a driving distance from homes — markedly increase loneliness. And loneliness is now considered an epidemic in Australia, as well as being as risky to our health as obesity. The issue is

In the first instalment of our Real Relationship series - exploring stakeholder engagement across a wide variety of topics - Jordin Payne takes a look at the new kids on the block: Generation Z. Born between 1995 and 2012, Generation Z is the first fully global generation of our society. A study conducted by McCrindle has labelled Generation Z as change agents capable of having influence over brand success. With 10.1 million Australians being avid users of social media, it is increasingly clear connection and perception matter. So, what’s important to Gen Z? Concerned with social impact, inclusion, authenticity and value, by

The joint declaration of Australia’s mining giants in support of an Aboriginal voice in Australia’s parliament has once again showed that industry is prepared to step up and address important social reform, where political leaders have proved reluctant to champion change. BHP and Rio Tinto have publicly stood behind the Uluru Statement from the Heart, which was penned by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people at a National Convention in May 2017 and underpins the theme of NAIDOC 2019 – Voice, Treaty, Truth. The Uluru Statement describes the long-running quest for recognition and constitutional reforms relating to our First Nations people, and

When it comes to assessing whether your community sponsorship is valuable, it is time to talk about intangible benefits. Yes, your logo will be getting seen. Yes, your name is on the sign. But what about the less visible benefits of your investment? Studies into the impact of intangible benefits of sponsoring sports, arts, community events or local facilities find a conundrum: either companies overestimate the value of the intangible benefits of their sponsorship — or they don’t count the benefits at all. There is also the risk that the intangible benefits — the opportunity to host your top corporate peers in a footy

Navigating your path through government engagement on any project can be a daunting task. Between departments and agencies, ministers, policy advisers, public servants, industry groups and lobbyists, there are plenty of reasons why you might feel lost. While the Government Relations team at Cannings Purple is here to guide you through these engagements, it is important not to forget about engaging with the community. Here are three reasons why: Politicians expect it: When we meet with politicians to talk about clients’ project/issues, there’s one question we are inevitably asked: “have you spoken to the community?” If the answer is “yes” and you

The mining sector needs to tell its story better. In the face of declining corporate trust, a potential skills shortage, and increasingly-advanced and organised activism against the broader mining industry, now is the time to tell stakeholders, communities, government and the public about the positive social and economic contributions the sector makes to Australian life. These are three areas the industry should focus on to improve how it is perceived, and help guarantee its social license to operate over the coming years and decades.  1) Education: If we are to attract new talent to the sector, we need to ensure WA youngsters understand

How quickly time flies when you have a battery metals boom underway. In a few week’s time, the world’s mining industry will turn its gaze to Kalgoorlie-Boulder again for the annual Diggers & Dealers extravaganza. Organisers of the mining conference – this year under new ownership for the first time since inception – will be hoping for a bumper turnout of well north of 2000 delegates for the three-day event (August 6-8). Based on applications from more than 100 companies for 48 speaking slots, and organisers’ decision to erect a second (albeit smaller) marquee, the buzz at Diggers should befit the hype surrounding