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How did formerly cutting-edge companies like Nokia and Kodak lose their way? Why do some businesses evolve, and yet others get left behind? What is the next Toys ‘R’ Us, or Blockbuster, or Blackberry, poised to go extinct through lack of innovation? Continual change is a guarantee of successful business, not just in terms of the processes you use or the services or products you offer: the culture of a business needs to evolve as well. Nokia is a good example of how a corporate culture didn’t evolve, leaving the company struggling to reclaim a once buoyant market share. Failing to appreciate

Accidentally said something you will really, really regret? As Ray Jordan writes, you are rubbing shoulders with illustrious company. Nothing is set in stone, so goes the oft-quoted idiom. Things can change but often with great difficulty. However, it seems that when it comes to realpolitik, some things really are set in stone, no matter how much you would like to be able to change them. There is nothing tangible or physical about words. They are just words. Yet once uttered they are uttered for eternity, as permanent as the ancient pyramids. And, ill-conceived and poorly thought through, they can come back

In this digital era nothing is not recorded, nor is it forgotten, writes Account Director Ray Jordan When Trump squared off against Hillary Clinton in the 2016  presidential election debates it brought the murky, tawdry side of US politics sharply into focus. The rhetoric about making America great again or being the president for all people was punctuated by cutting vitriol that plumbed new depths. The problem was that any chance to focus on the issues that matter, or put election promises and pork barrelling under the microscope, was lost on prurient matters that were not simply a result of Trump’s vile