Begin typing your search above and press return to search. Press Esc to cancel.

As the worst economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic appear to be waning, the cost of living is coming into focus as the major issue facing Australians, potentially swinging their vote as the election approaches. But why are we finding it harder to make ends meet? Will things get better soon? And what can the Commonwealth government do to help ease the pressure? Well, as my old State Treasury colleagues would say: it’s complicated and it depends. Inflation creation Rising cost of living is generally synonymous with higher inflation.  But inflation has been fairly stable over the last five years with the Consumer

Christmas came early for many on the 13 December last year, when WA Premier Mark McGowan announced the State Government would embark on its “Safe Transition Plan” and ease hard border controls from 12.01am on February 5, 2022.  Families rejoiced, weddings were locked in and flights were booked. Business breathed a sigh of relief, plans were made and talent recruited.   But alas, 37 days later everything changed. Mr McGowan again fronted the media (this time in prime time) and announced that WA would live up to the name ‘Wait Awhile’ and would not be opening on February 5. That date sailed by

Premier Mark McGowan has advised Western Australians of his action plan for when the State hits inevitable ‘high caseload’ of COVID-19 cases, with a Friday afternoon press conference outlining a series of complex changes.  The detail-heavy guide will apply once WA hits a high caseload, he warned, but said it was too early to define what a high caseload is, drawing a distinction between large numbers in the community while infectious and similar or larger numbers who might be infected while in isolation.   “There is no hard number of cases that define what a high caseload environment is,” he told the media.   “It

Remember the days where Australia’s COVID-19 cases hovered between the 1,000 to 2,000 mark? You should because that was a few weeks ago.  How long ago that now seems.   At the time of writing, Australia had just reached a record, nearing 100,000 positive COVID-19 test results recorded nationally in 24 hours. But even that figure is merely an estimate, with thousands being turned away as testing clinics reach capacity each day within just a few hours of opening.   By the time you’re reading this, it’s not an exaggeration to assume that figure has probably doubled.  In fact, we have gone from almost nothing six