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For many years, the traditional art of storytelling was seen as being of high importance to the delivery of content – and you can see why: the best storytelling has creativity at its heart. It’s almost as if the teller takes his audience and puts them in the story. But what if you could actually, really do that? Wouldn’t “old school” storytelling lose a little bit of its bite if there was an alternative that placed the audience directly into the thick of the action? That’s exactly what’s playing out on social media, as storytelling makes way for storyliving. Storytelling, for all its

Warning: the following story contains lots of rude words — sort of. It’s not that they are really rude, but more that they don’t fit the strict rules imposed by our digital world. You know, the kinds of rules that seek to clean up websites, stop smutty posts being added on Facebook, or prevent you writing body parts randomly on forms instead of your real name. And that’s the kind of thinking that caught out Natalie Weiner. https://twitter.com/natalieweiner/status/1034533245839450113 Natalie, as we will call her to get this post through your spam filter, wasn’t alone. Her pain was shared by James Butts, Ben Schmuck, several blokes named

In the history of the internet, fame can be instant, short and fleeting. Remember MySpace? Altavista? AOL? Ask Jeeves? Senior Graphic Designer Adam Elovalis discusses why Wordpress’ 15th birthday proves it is one of a chosen few tech companies to make the milestone. History To little fanfare, on the 27th of May 2003, a small, free, but abandoned content management system, b2/cafelog was relaunched as Wordpress by young college students, Matt Mullenweg and Mike Little. They were determined to keep it free and supported forever. With its enormous community of plugins, themes and support, it has changed the face of the internet

How can Media Intelligence give you a jump on your competitors? We asked Sarah-Jane Dabarera what businesses need to know about monitoring their activity —  and that of others. Unless your company has been hiding under a rock, you will know there’s been a revolution in data in recent years. With regards to your organisation’s digital presence, information now exists on everything from instant analytics on your reach per tweet, to better alerts when your business gets a mention in the press. There is a wealth of information available which we call media intelligence. But data without analysis is just

It’s not an acronym that rolls off the tongue, but dramatic changes in data breach legislation mean knowing about OAIC — the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner — is vital for all Australian businesses, writes Jamie Wilkinson. If you’ve not heard of the OAIC before, you have a matter of weeks before it could become the most important four letter acronym in your world. The OAIC is the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner. It is a government agency with three main roles: overseeing privacy issues, freedom of information functions and government information policy functions. And within that remit is a duty to

It’s that time of year when gym memberships soar and everyone drags out their lycra for a spin. But what about your social media profiles? Ruth Callaghan suggests some New Year resolutions for your LinkedIn. Is your professional profile looking a bit flabby? Is your CV four years out of date, your contact list in a stack of lacky-banded business cards and your staff photograph of a much younger, wilder you? Perhaps it is time to give your most important social profile a 2018 makeover. LinkedIn is the most important social media account most corporate workers own — but it is

It’s time to re-examine media monitoring, writes Sarah-Jane Aston, thanks to a revolution in data. Preparing a media monitoring report used to mean cutting up newspapers and pasting hard-copy clippings into bulky books, that would sit proudly gathering dust. Now PDFs pop into inboxes where they can sit unopened for days on end. But the increasing availability of public data means the insight and reporting which can be derived from coverage can make monitoring a powerful tool for any business. If you are still scrapbooking you are doing it wrong Media monitoring is not, and should never be, viewed as just a scrapbook of “brand

Using social media to promote your brand is a no-brainer these days, our CRM Officer Lauren Pow discusses the problem with thinking that means every tweet or post needs to be about themselves. We recommend the 80:20 principle as a cardinal rule for social media content marketing: 80% of what you post on your business accounts should be educational, entertaining and interesting to your audience. Only 20% should be directly promotional. One of the content solutions we’d recommend adopting in your 80% would be sharing the success of your clients. And while it might not seem obvious to promote someone else’s business above

Dependency on technology has resulted in an increased risk of cyber-attacks. Sarah-Jane Aston looks at the plans you need to have in place under the new mandatory reporting laws for when – not if – the attack comes.  The recent Wannacry global attack that affected at least 150 countries and more than 200,000 computers is an example of how much of an impact a data breach can have on business. It saw computers in organisations that ranged from hospitals to banks to corporates encrypted by a modern-day highway robbery tactic known as ransomware: Pay up in bitcoin or your data gets it. Beyond

Director of Design and Digital, Jamie Wilkinson considers 4 reasons professional services businesses should be using video.     1. The statistics. Cisco (the IT and networking company) estimate that 80% of the internet will be video by 2020. Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg has said his challenge in the coming 5 years is to prepare the platform for a time when just about all content on it will be video. We are heading for an era when text, and photos to some extent, will be superseded by video. It’s going to become the default tool for public communications – now is the time to get

It is the social media question everyone is asking and our Consultant Emma Britton has the answer. Social media is about immediacy, the here and now, keeping your finger on the pulse. You like what your friend ate for breakfast this morning, your business responds to customers in seconds, and your intelligence team stays up to the minute with trending topics … yes? But since humans need to sleep, and your people have other things to do than hang out on Facebook, how do you maintain that instant engagement over time? The answer lies in social media content scheduling, but finding the right balance

In politics today – as in business – social media forms a key part of the modern arsenal. It’s the new home of political debate, and social media is increasingly being used as a tool to deliver messages and connect to voters across the full political spectrum. But while it’s easy to see who’s got a Twitter account, who’s live streaming their announcements on Facebook and who’s kissing babies on Instagram, how do you tell which political players are actually effective on social media? And why does it matter? Cannings Purple has turned its analytical eye on the use of social media

You’ve followed every election announcement and scrutinised every promise made – but just how well do you really know the policies? An analysis of candidate statements and policies proposed by a range of minor parties contesting the Western Australian election reveals a diverse and colourful grab bag of positions. And pinning the policy to the party is often more difficult than you might think Cannings Purple Senior Media Strategist, Ruth Callaghan, said some of the minor parties were expanding policy platforms in a bid to target specific voting blocks which were identifiable and active on Facebook. “The jostling for first preferences is resulting in

User experience is not just a design consideration – it can be the measure of your success, writes Cannings Purple Senior Graphic Designer Adam Elovalis. We live in a world in which even the smallest tweak to a user interface, from Apple’s new design for its Music app, to the way a brand communicates on social media, can create millions of online shares and virtual column inches. User experience (UX) done well can create reputational kudos. Done badly, it can frustrate and anger your customers and clients. What is User Experience? User experience is any method by which a customer or prospective customer interacts with your

User experience is about being curious, asking a lot of questions and challenging assumptions. Senior Designer Adam Elovalis says asking yourself these 5 things will help you identify how better to improve your user experience. 1. Have I Got Quantitative Data To Backup And Challenge Assumptions? This is absolutely crucial. To avoid making incorrect assumptions, real data is needed to detail how people use your site. Services like Google Analytics are very useful in tracking the behaviours of your users and finding key demographics. It’s also a good idea to have social media monitoring to track mentions of your brand; hard evidence can

Annual reports are no longer the same beasts they were 10 years ago - Cameron Jones explores the evolution of this critical business document. The glory days of the annual report Once upon a time, back when Yahoo was something cowboys said and Gumtree simply meant a native Australian tree, Annual Reports were the centrepiece of every listed company’s arsenal. Sure it was still a compliance document, but companies would go to great lengths to make sure it was going to impress their shareholders. All kinds of wiz-bang papers, effects, graphics and photography were used to woo investors into reassuring them they had their money in

Digital and Design Director Jamie Wilkinson discusses what we can learn from #censusfail, regardless of why the census site went down on the 9th August. 1. When trouble’s brewing engage, don’t dismiss. This has been a bubbling story for weeks, as various privacy-focused social media users raised concerns about the security of the system, implications of data matching, and risk of recording names and addresses for four years rather than 18 months. A week ago, news began filtering in about issues regarding the peculiar logic behind some of the online questions and there was growing anger in some communities regarding the requirements to

10 years ago social media didn’t exist in politics, Associate Director Ruth Callaghan discusses how today it plays an increasingly vital role in how a politician is perceived and his or her ability to cut through election noise. With the US election primaries still running hot, and a faux Federal election already underway in Australia, it’s worth looking at four ways social media is making an impact. 1. Welcome Snapchat. This is already being hailed as the first Snapchat presidential election in the US with the app making inroads in influencing election messaging and coverage. So far, though, it has had less impact in